10 Royal Palaces That Would Make Jealous Even Billionaires

We all have dreamt of living in a palace at one point in our lives. They’re residences designed for royalty, and we all wished to discover if they have any secrets passages just like in movies. The following list shows some of the most beautiful palaces in the world. Let’s take a look!

10. Pena National Palace

This structure was built in Portugal in 1842 by King Ferdinand II on the ruins of a monastery that collapsed after an earthquake in 1755. It was erected in the 19th-century romanticist style with influences from Manueline and Moorish architecture.

Located on the Sintra Hills, it’s designed to be visible from every point in the park surrounding it, which features beautiful gardens, with several different species of trees that were brought from all around the world to enhance its beauty.

Image credits: Twitter/richey4fun

Image credits: Twitter/richey4fun

9. Mysore Palace

Also known as Ambavilas Palace, the structure is the royal residence of the Wadiyar dynasty in the Southern Karnataka state of India. It’s right in the middle of Mysore, a city that’s mostly referred to as ‘City of Palaces,’ because it has seven including Ambavilas.

Yaduraya built the fortress in the Old Fort back in the 14th century, but it has been remodeled several times over the years. The latest edifice was constructed from 1897 to 1912 after the old one burned to the ground.

Image credits: Twitter/shyamvpk

Image credits: Twitter/shyamvpk

8. Schönbrunn Palace

It’s located in the city of Vienna, Austria and was formerly the summer residence of royalty. The structure was erected in the Baroque style with more than 1,000 rooms, making it one of the most impressive monuments in the country.

Nowadays, the palace is a huge tourist attraction and has been since the 1950s. More than 3 million people visited Schönbrunn in 2017. Its history goes back more than 300 years, becoming a reflection of the Habsburg monarchy.

Image credits: Twitter/janeellen_

Image credits: Twitter/janeellen_

7. Summer Palace

Located in Beijing, China, this place is a collection of lakes, gardens and several imperial palaces dating back to the Qing Dynasty. It spans 2.9 square kilometers of land, though most of it is covered in water, through Longevity Hill to Kunming Lake.

In 1998, the palace was included on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, calling it, ‘a masterpiece of Chinese landscape garden design. The natural landscape of hills and open water is combined with artificial features such as pavilions, halls, palaces, temples and bridges to form a harmonious ensemble of outstanding aesthetic value.’

Image credits: Twitter/beijingofficial

Image credits: Twitter/beijingofficial

6. Palace of Versailles

It was the royal residence of Louis XIV since 1682 until the French Revolution in 1789 with Louis XVI. The structure is located in Yvelines, on the region of Île-de-France, 12 miles south-west of Paris. Just like The Summer Palace, this gorgeous land was named a UNESCO World Heritage place with a special mention for the Hall of Mirrors and the Royal Opera.

Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon, located within the grounds were private residences for the monarchs. The rustic Hameau was built for Marie Antoinette while its amazing gardens were designed by André Le Nôtre. Many things were stolen from the palace during the French Revolution, but most have been returned.

Image credits: Twitter/uramazingplaces

Image credits: Twitter/uramazingplaces

5. The Château de Chambord

Located in Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France, the castle is known all over the world for the beautiful representation of French Renaissance architecture, which seamlessly adapted French medieval styles with new building constructions. It was planned by King Francis I of France, but never finished.

The city itself was built as a hunting lodge for Francis I, whose primary residences were the Château de Blois and Amboise. The original design of The Château de Chambord was first thought to be the work of Domenico Da Cortona, but many people believe that Leonardo Da Vinci was involved as well.

Image credits: Twitter/francedecouvrir

Image credits: Twitter/francedecouvrir

4. Buckingham Palace

Located in Westminster, it’s the principal residence for the United Kingdom monarchs. The palace hosts several official events every year, and it’s the best place to show royal cordiality. British people often visit the outside during important national events and even sad times for the country.

The palace was first known as Buckingham House, and it was initially a big townhouse designed for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703. King George II bought it in 1761 as the private home for Queen Charlotte, and since then it has been known as The Queen’s House. The structure got an expansion in the 19th century and became the principal residence for British Royalty in 1837 with Queen Victoria.

Image credits: Twitter/aladyinlondon

Image credits: Twitter/aladyinlondon

3. The Alhambra

This palace is also a fortress in Granada, Andalusia, Spain, originally erected in AD 889 out of the ruins of Roman battlements. It was abandoned until a remodel in the 13th century from Nasrid emir Mohammed ben Al-Ahmar, the Emirate of Granada. Yusuf I, the Sultan of Granada, later converted it to a royal palace in 1333.

After the Christian Reconquista in 1492, the palace became the Royal Court of Ferdinand and Isabella. It’s the location where Christopher Columbus received money for his famous expedition that led to discovering America. It’s now a tourist attraction and another UNESCO World Heritage site.

Image credits: Twitter/conniereads_

Image credits: Twitter/conniereads_

2. The Potala Palace

Located in Lhasa, Tibet, it was the home of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama had to escape to India in 1959 during the Tibetan revolution. The structure is now a museum and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The building was erected in 1645 by the 5th Dalai Lama because its location was beneficial to government endeavors, as it stands next to Drepung and Sera monasteries and Lhasa. The three central hills of Lhasa are considered the ‘Three Protectors of Tibet.’

Image credits: Twitter/genedigregorio

Image credits: Twitter/genedigregorio

1. The Forbidden City

Located in central Beijing, China, it was the imperial palace of the Ming Dynasty and continued until the Qing Dynasty – that’s almost 500 years. It now hosts a palace museum, with a collection of priceless pieces from the Ming and Qing dynasties.

Image credits: Twitter/chaseglobalitg

Image credits: Twitter/chaseglobalitg

Part of the collection is now in the National Palace Museum in Taipei because it was split during the Chinese Civil War. It’s a booming tourist location these days, with millions of visitors every year. In 2017, more than 16 million people visited the palace.

These palaces are incredible structures that, fortunately, have been preserved so that people can visit them and learn about history at the time. The world would be a sad place if we didn’t think about the past and reflect on our evolution as a society. If you liked this article, share it with your friends. See you next time!

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