10 places on Earth that a few human beings have ever set foot on

It’s true that today there exists the necessary technology to not overlook any corner of the world, but what if we haven't explored the entire planet yet? Although we have all kinds of means of transport, we have visited the Moon, we have immersed ourselves in the deepest abysses, we have been in the highest mountains, the world still hides places still unexplored by the human being.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

The feeling that there is nothing left to discover, to step before any other, is increased if we consider that the last two places discovered in the continental United States, a river, and a mountain range, were found by a famous explorer. They are neither very deep nor very high. They are simply there, and some even reserve interesting scientific findings. They are just waiting for someone to step on them like the most famous explorers.

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This surveyor by the name of Almon Thompson explored the desert plains of central Utah, mapping what is known as Potato Creek in Colorado and a 48-km mountain range called now the Henry Mountains.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

There they are: some are inhabited, others are not. What’s very apparent is that they all have a common feature: scientists have not explored them enough. Let's start and get to know these unexplored places on Earth.

1. Kamchatka, Russia

The Kamchatka Peninsula is the easternmost point of Russia and is the place with the highest volcanic activity on the planet. It has more than 300 volcanoes and one of them is in permanent eruption since 1996.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

It’s home to most of the salmon species, and where most of the world's brown bears are found. Still, it remains one of the least known and most explored places on the planet due to the heavy military restrictions imposed by the government of the Soviet Union until 1991.

2. Foja Mountains, Papua New Guinea

In Papua New Guinea, you have the Foja Mountains, which are more than 810,000 hectares of primary tropical forest covering everything. The heart of its jungle has never been mapped. At the moment, the perimeter is examined, where unknown species of plants and animals have been discovered.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

In November and December of the year 2005, a team of field naturalists from Indonesia, North America, England and Australia, carried out the first comprehensive biodiversity inventory of the Foja Mountains, and in a single month of the year 2005, more than forty new species were discovered.

3. Gangkhar Puensum, Bhutan

At 7,570 meters, this mountain of Bhutan is the highest in the world without a human setting foot in its summit.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

This impressive peak on the border between Tibet and Bhutan is one of the highest mountains in the world. According to historical records, the explorers had problems even to locate this mountain. The maps were very inaccurate and even after people discovered where it was, it was almost impossible to get there.

In 1985, a team from Great Britain tried to climb the mountain, but the crew members became ill and had to return. In 1986, a monsoon prevented an Austrian climbing team from fulfilling its objective.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

In 1987, the government of Bhutan totally banned the climb to the Gangkhar Puensum because there are rumors that powerful spirits inhabit the mountain peak.

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4. Mariana Trench

The Marianas Trench is located in the Pacific Ocean near Japan and is the deepest place on the planet. The ditch was created when a tectonic plate covered with oceanic crust slid down. It was first discovered in 1951 by the HMS Challenger II, so the deepest point is called Challenger Abyss.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

In 1960, the Swiss scientist Jacques Piccard and Donald Walsh Colonel of the US Navy traveled to the bottom of the Challenger Abyss in a submarine designed by Piccard's father.

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However, they could not get to the bottom, and when they were going to 16,000 pounds of pressure, they returned to the surface.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Recently, the film director James Cameron made an expedition to the bottom of Mariana's pit, with a submersible that helped design, and managed to take some incredible photographs, even discovered a new species of marine animal. But the ditch is almost completely unexplored and there would still be much to discover there.

5. Kimberley, Australia

Visiting this Australian spot is difficult due to the lack of roads. The coast, hit by strong tides, is rugged and is surrounded by islands and coral reefs.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

The region is named after John Wodehouse, First Count of Kimberley. It’s also one of the hottest parts of Australia, with an average annual average temperature of around 27 ° C

6. Oodaaq Island, Greenland

There are six "explored" islands north of Kaffeklubben in Greenland. By "explored" we mean that someone, at some point, set foot in them. The Oodaaq was discovered in 1978 when a Danish exploration team led by Uffe Petersen landed on the island of Kaffeklubben to confirm that it’s actually located in the far north of Greenland.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

A team member pointed to a dark place to the north, which turned out to be a clay bank. It was named Oodaaq in honor of the Eskimos who accompanied Robert Peary on his historic trip to the North Pole.

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7. Kalimantan, Indonesia

In Indonesia, on the peninsula of Mangkalihat, in the southern area of the island of Borneo known as Kalimantan, we find this sea of limestone in the middle of a jungle forest that looks like an extraterrestrial planet.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

The first organized exploration was carried out in 1982, and since then, a team has been taking care every summer to survey kilometers of underground galleries flying over helicopters and walking during shore excursions, but there is still much to discover.

8. Congolese rainforest

The Congo is one of the least explored areas of Earth today. The Congo Basin, which covers 15% of Africa, has been a fascinating topic for both the local population and foreigners. Native tribes of Pygmies tell stories about prehistoric creatures that cross the Congo, while foreigners like to investigate and discuss the different Pygmy tribes.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

The Congo is populated largely by the Bantu peoples and was first explored by Henry Morton Stanley in 1876. Although Stanley traveled about 7,000 miles across Africa in three years, the Congo was a mystery to him and it continues to be so for us now.

9. Vostok Lake, Antarctica

Antarctica remains a mystery, even in the 21st century. Most of the expeditions are in Tierra del Fuego, one of the southernmost parts of the country. One of the most interesting places that can be found in Antarctica is Lake Vostok.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Located in the east, there is a hypothesis that ice has covered this lake for 25 million years, so it’s likely that unusual fossils and life forms can be found inside it. Although the lake has been discovered in 1993, it has not been thoroughly explored and the few samples that have been taken have not been examined in a concrete way.

10. Machaahupare, Nepal

Machapuchare or Machhaphuchhare is a mountain in the Himalayas in northern Nepal and near Annapurna. The Machapuchare is located about 25 km north of Pokhara, the main city of the region.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

It’s a place that the local population considers sacred and there are limits imposed on people who want to climb it. In 1957, Wilfrid Noyce and ADM Cox climbed the Machapuchare but didn’t reach the top. They failed because of physical resistance, although Noyce had already climbed Everest.

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However, there is another legend that, according to popular belief, Lord Shiva lives on the top of the sacred mountain, the King of Nepal asked Noyce and his companion not to reach the top.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Image Credits: Pixabay.

Bill Denz, a rather daring New Zealand climber, didn’t care what the Indians were talking about and went to the top of the mountain in 1980. Subsequently, Denz died in Mansaw, another Himalayan mountain in 1983.

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