Dog trainer 'hurt and mad' when retired police dog ends up in a shelter

Dec 17, 2018
03:30 P.M.
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Service dogs are one of the noblest types of animals; spending their lives being man’s best friend. However, a retired police dog did not have his service reciprocated when he was dumped recently.

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A retired police dog, Ringo, was on record as living with his handler. He was recently abandoned at an animal shelter in the area.

Read more on our Twitter @amomama_usa.

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LOST DOG

A dog trainer at the Alpha K-9 training center in Jackson, Randy Hare, trained Ringo and is curious to know what took place to make the dog end up at an animal shelter.

Ringo, a Labrador retriever, worked for the Jackson Police Department for nearly a decade. Once Randy heard that Ringo was at the shelter he organized with them.

Twitter/Eyewitness News

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The police were also informed of what had happened, and the handler who dumped Ringo was demoted. He is now on patrol duty.

Randy has expressed that the incident causes him to no longer wanted to train police dogs for the Jackson Police Department.

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WHERE DO THEY GO?

Once police dogs retire, there is a specific due process that needs to be followed. They are usually rehomed when they reach the end of their career.

Putting down a dog is only ever used as a last resort when they have health complications. However, there are some units which do this to be given newer, younger dogs.

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The waiting list to adopt a former working dog in the UK is quite long, and the new owners are delighted and excited when their turn comes around.

ADOPTION OPTION

This policy of ex-police dogs being matched up with non-police family has not always been around everywhere. It only recently became legal in Singapore.

Singapore Police Force

Earlier this year it became possible for the public to adopt retired police dogs into their families. The policy is called Project Adore.

Previously only police staff and handlers were allowed to adopt former police dogs.

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