Here's Where Agnes Moorehead's Presence Is Still Visible

The late movie and television star Agnes Moorehead had a fantastic career with big and small screen presence. The world lost the amazing personality on 30th April 1974 but her presence still lingers in the house she willed to Muskingum University.

Of course, there haven’t been ‘sightings’ yet but the spirit of the talent can still be felt in the premises of the dream house she had built for her retirement. 

A marvelous actress covered every field of entertainment from performing in over one hundred films, doing dozens of radio programs, taking on numerous television work and acting in theater, to touring as a public speaker.

She had a versatile way of working. She could take a character, a personality and give it an attitude, an aura, or even a soul. 

Despite performing since a young age and building characters to fit her moods, the actress would pretend to be someone completely different whenever she didn’t feel like being Agnes.

Although talented, the star remained in doubt herself -- she never considered herself as ‘pretty.’ "As a little girl I was the long gangly type, almost as tall as I am now ( 5'6" ), it was sad and pathetic," she said

Her personality of Endora on the television show "Bewitched," who didn't like her witch of a daughter marrying a mortal man received six Emmy nominations for her work on the series over eight seasons. Talk about fitting in with the character. 

Her work also got her an Emmy for the Outstanding Supporting Actress for a guest role in the movie ‘The Wild, Wild West’ in 1967. 

During her career, Moorehead funded the construction of a home she could retire to outside of New Concord. It was built between 1968 and 1972 in a wooded area where Moorehead and her sister used to play.

A few handpicked pieces such as doorknobs, the cemetery gate from England, all have a strong aura of Moorehead in them and it will feel like she is the host if you ever happen to visit the establishment.

Some original fixtures are still in the house, including dishes protected by a small, handwritten card.