'Superman' star Margot Kidder's death ruled a suicide

Maria Varela
Aug 09, 2018
09:42 P.M.
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It appears that Margot Kidder's death a few months ago isn't what it seemed to be.  A new report confirms the actress died of suicide.

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Months after Kidder was found dead in her Montana home, new information has been released regarding the cause of her death, USA Today reported.

The latest report by the Park County coroner’s office states that the actress died of suicide. Her daughter is relieved that the truth has finally been revealed. 

In May, it was assumed Kidder, 69, had died peacefully in her sleep when her body was discovered in her home in Livingston, a small town near Yellowstone National Park.

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Now three months later, findings are shedding new light on what actually happened. 

Richard Wood, the coroner in charge of the case, revealed the star popular for her perky role as Lois Lane in the Superman franchise “died as a result of a self-inflicted drug and alcohol overdose.”

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McGuane, who Kidder shares with her ex-husband Thomas McGuane, said that she knew her mother had committed suicide the moment she saw the scene of her death.

And now all she feels is “a big relief that the truth is out there.” She added, 

“It’s important to be open and honest so there’s not a cloud of shame in dealing with this.”

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Kidder battled with mental illness for most of her life. According to her diaries, she tried to kill herself when she was only 14.

She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder later and had a highly publicized manic episode in 1996 in which she lived on the streets for several days.

Kidder was discovered by authorities “dirty, frightened and paranoid” and hiding behind bushes of a backyard in Glendale. She was taken to a psychiatric hospital for observation following the incident.

Kidder’s career highlight was her role as Christopher Reeves’ love interest in four "Superman" films.

She has over 130 movie credits to her name including "Black Christmas," "The Great Waldo Pepper," and "The Amityville Horror."

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