This guy looks and sounds like John Denver

Many people can't believe how much the singer, Ted Vigil, looks and sounds like John Denver.

According to Country Thang Daily, Vigil is best known as a John Denver tribute artist. A lot of people said that he's the missing twin of the legendary singer. Some even call him John Denver 2.0.

He once said in a phone interview:

“I get it every day; get it at the grocery store; get it when I’m jogging with my ski hat on. It’s the first thing that my mother-in-law said when I met her 30 years ago: ‘You kind of look like John Denver.’"

Follow us on our Twitter account, @amomama_usa, to learn more and scroll down to watch Vigil paying tribute to the veteran singer in the video below.

Vigil has performed twice for Denver's Windstar Foundation in Aspen, Colorado. He has also sold out venues in Pennsylvania, Kansas.

The singer has always had an adoration for music and the stage. He also played drums and percussion in the Concert, Jazz, Symphonic and Marching bands during the high school years.

After he graduated from high school, he started singing and playing drums in Top 40 bands and voyaged everywhere throughout the Northwest.

In 1990, Vigil started composing, recording and playing out his unique pieces.

He won the national title for "Talent Quest" in 2006 in Laughlin Nevada. After his win, he started to plan a John Denver Tribute show.

Vigil then began singing his route everywhere throughout the U.S. During the yearly "Voyaging Kountry Kruz" with the Royal Caribbean Cruise Line in 2007, he shared the stage with Keith Anderson, Jeff Bates, and Kevin Sharp.

Three years later, he performed with Denver's Lead guitarist, Steve Weisberg and Eddie Kilgallon, keyboard player for award-winning bands Ricochet and Montgomery Gentry.

Vigil has been touring the nation with the tribute show and providing the late vocalist's fans a night of melodic memories throughout the previous couple of years.

Denver, who died in the crash of his experimental plane on October 12, 1997, at age 53, tells and sings the story of his very first guitar during a Denver TV special in 1974, according to Rolling Stone.

The singer said that when he was about 12 years old, he received the vintage instrument from his grandmother.

After Denver's demise, his family donated the guitar for use in an exhibit honoring the musician at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix, Arizona.