2-Year-Old Battling Rare Brain Disease Is in Critical Condition after Contracting the Flu

Little Layla is battling a rare brain disease following a diagnosis showing she has Influenza A led to an even worse discovery. It's been 10 years since doctors have witnessed this situation. 

Layla Thomas is just two years old, but she's already fighting for her life. On March 8, the Missouri toddler's parents learned that their little girl had Influenza A. 

She was also faced with a condition called necrotizing encephalopathy. The brain disease is usually caused by viral infections or some other form of an acute febrile disease. 

Nancy Lynn, who is reportedly Layla's grand godmother, shared a picture of the young girl along with information about the situation. She thanked well-wishers for prayers and positive thoughts. The post is found below.

The family has also started a GoFundMe page to raise money to cover medical expenses for Layla. The little one is currently receiving blood transfusions while in an induced coma. 

At first, Layla was found to have a very high fever at 107 degrees. She also displayed symptoms of the flu. Now, her family is saying she has "a 50/50 chance of survival."

Her aunt Jessica Kile explained :

“She had just a runny nose, maybe a little cough but nothing out of the ordinary that we haven’t seen before.”

By the time Layla was settled in the hospital bed, Kile said they "had her hooked up to everything imaginable. She’s completely unresponsive and is making small eye movements.”

Yet the family is hopeful as Layla is "showing signs of improvement every day." Her recovery will be at least a few months long, but she will be supported every step of the way by her family and friends. 

Dr. Rachel Orschein, who is a specialist of infectious diseases, told the media that “we are still seeing a high number of flu cases in the St. Louis area.”

She warned parents to take heed of signs like a loss of appetite, sleepiness, and seizures. “Even with appropriate anti-viral treatments some of these severe complications can result in permanent disability or even death,” she explained. 

According to one report, caretakers can identify serious cases of the flu by looking out for other symptoms like breathing problems, extreme irritability, and rash alongside a fever. 

Children who already suffer from illnesses such as asthma, diabetes, heart conditions, and cerebral palsy are more susceptible to contracting influenza. 

In November 2018, Olivia Paregol, a freshman of the University of Maryland, passed away after she contracted Adenovirus, type seven strain. The illness was further identified in five other students. 

In New Jersey, 11 children died from the same strain between September 26 and November 21. New Jersey Department of Health commissioner, Dr. Shereef Elnaha, stated that failed containment of already infected persons was the cause. 

We pray that Layla has a successful recovery from her sickness so that her family will not have to endure such a painful loss. No little girl deserves to be fighting such a tough battle.