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February 03, 2021

Captain Sir Tom Moore Dies at 100 of COVID-19 — Remembering His Life & Fight Against the Virus

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Iconic war veteran Captain Sir Tom Moore has passed away at 100 years from COVID-19 complications. Sir Moore lived an impactful life serving his country and helping others.

Captain Sir Tom Moore, the war veteran who helped the NHS raise millions amid the lockdown last year, has passed away at 100 years old. The national hero died from COVID-19 on Tuesday, February 2.

While the world is heartbroken by the loss of a legend, his long and profound, impactful life from serving in World War II to being knighted by the Queen. Here is a look into Moore's battle with the virus and his exemplary life.

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MOORE'S OBITUARY

Moore tested positive for COVID-19 on January 31 and was taken to the hospital after experiencing breathing difficulties. Earlier that month, he had battled pneumonia. Unfortunately, his death was announced on Tuesday via a statement that read:

"The last year of our father's life was nothing short of remarkable. He was rejuvenated and experienced things he'd only ever dreamed of."

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Moore's death shook the world, and prominent personalities from around the globe sent their condolences. The Queen and Buckingham Palace sent a private message to his family while Prime Minister Boris Johnson described him as a "hero."

[Moore's] impressive fund-raising gesture reportedly began as a family joke.

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HIS EARLY LIFE

Born in 1920 in Keighley, West Yorkshire to Wilfred and Isabella, a primary school headteacher, Moore went to school at Keighley boys' grammar school and became an apprentice civil engineer.

When World War II began, he got enlisted in the 8 DWR (145 RAC) of the British Army and became eligible for officer training in 1940. He served on tanks and had stations in India, Sumatra, and Burma.

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After the war, Moore remained stationed at Bovington Camp in Dorset, serving as an instructor. He soon became a civilian again and worked as a salesman for a roofing company. He was also the managing director of a concrete company.

HIS GROUND-BREAKING NHS GESTURE

Moore's impact on the world wasn't fully felt until last year, three weeks before his 100th birthday. After enduring a fall in his kitchen in 2018 that broke his hip, Moore underwent hip surgery.

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His impressive fund-raising gesture reportedly began as a family joke with his kids promising to give him £1 for every lap he completed around his daughter's Bedfordshire home garden. The modest walk began with a simple goal of £1,000 for the NHS.

It started on April 6, but within days the target was moved to £5,000 and then £500,000. In no time, Moore's somewhat simple gesture raised a total of £33 million ($45 million) and earned him a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II.

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HIS PERSONAL LIFE

Moore first got married in 1949 to his first wife, Billie, but they called it quits after 18 years, filing for divorce. He found love again in the arms of Pamela Paull, the head office manager at the concrete office. They tied the knot in 1968. 

The lovebirds were together until her tragic death in 2006 from Dementia. The renowned captain is survived by his daughters Hannah and Lucy and two grandchildren, Benjie and Georgia.

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We at news.AmoMama.com do our best to give you the most updated news regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, but the situation is constantly changing. We encourage readers to refer to the online updates from CDС, WHO, or Local Health Departments to stay updated.Take care!