CelebrityMusicians

October 29, 2021

Paula Abdul Once Had a Deceased Woman Found near Her House Surrounded by Her CD's and Photos

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Paula Abdul has been a fan favorite since she made her debut in the entertainment scene four decades ago. However, there was one fan whose obsession with the dancer went too far.

It is hard to imagine anyone not loving Paula Abdul. She has several hit songs, some of which became club anthems; she has won several awards and still looks ageless despite approaching her 60s.

Abdul's Instagram page has over four hundred thousand followers, not depicting the fame she once held. Her popularity took a dip in the '90s after taking a break from entertainment, which she claimed was due to an injury she sustained in a plane crash.

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A picture of Paula Abdul [left]. Paula Goodspeed who auditioned for American Idol at the Rose Bowl Stadium where the auditions for the show where held on August 3, 2003 in Pasadena, California [right] | Photo: Getty Images

It was not hard for the television star to reclaim the trust of her fans when she returned from her break. Abdul quickly featured in several shows, released hit jams while also playing minor roles in films.

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While getting her life back on track, the famous dancer had an experience with a fan whose obsession crossed a line. One day, the music sensation woke up to find the body of a woman lying lifeless close to her home.

Paula Abdul interacts with fans while on stage during WE Day Minnesota at Xcel Energy Center on September 20, 2016 in St Paul, Minnesota | Photo: Getty Images

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OBSESSION GONE WRONG

Abdul appeared as a judge on "American Idol" alongside the famous Simon Cowell. During her appearance on the show, she met a contestant who would become overly obsessed with her.

Paula, originally, Sandra Goodspeed was found dead in her car, parked close to Abdul's house in what appeared to be a case of suicide. Authorities easily recognized her since she was notorious for stalking Abdul.

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According to reports, prescription pills, CDs, and pictures of the singer were found littered in Goodspeed's car. Her death came a few hours after her family reported her missing to the local police station.

According to the Ventura County Sheriff's Department, Public Information Officer Ross Bonfiglio, a close relative of Goodspeed, called the sheriff's office to complain about her disappearance. He also voiced concerns that she might try to overdose.

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He then shared her psychiatric history with the authorities alongside her obsession with Abdul. Goodspeed was said to have had a long history of mental illness, and her stalking case was being investigated before her death.

Goodspeed's infatuation with Abdul was frightening to the singer. According to reports, the license plate on her car read "ABL LV," and one of Abdul's pictures could be seen hanging from the rear-view mirror.

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Goodspeed also posted a sensual photo of Abdul with her lips open and tongue exposed on her MySpace profile, calling Abdul her secret obsession.

Abdul was at the "American Idol" studio when officials informed her of Goodspeed's passing. She issued a statement via her representatives, expressing her sadness over the passing of the woman who had stalked her.

Before her death, Goodspeed reportedly sent flowers to Abdul's home, alongside a note including her new cell number. That was one of the many letters and uninvited visits the '80s star girl received from Goodspeed in three years.

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THE INFAMOUS AUDITION

Goodspeed had made it to the third round of the 2006 edition of the popular singing show, "American Idol." During an interview with show host Ryan Seacrest, she admitted to being a diehard Abdul fan.

She confessed to making life-sized drawings of Abdul, noting that she had been the singer's fan since she was a kid. Abdul was the first person she drew as a little girl, and age did not affect her passion for her idol.

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During her appearance on "American Idol," Goodspeed was compared to Abdul by Cowell. He said both stars shared some similarities aside from their first name, but that was before they heard her audition.

Goodspeed's audition proved to be a total disaster as she went off-key during her performance of the Tina Turner hit song, "Proud Mary." Abdul commented on her audition, noting that it was not a good experience, but Cowell delivered the last blow.

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Famous for his blunt assessment of participants, Cowell attacked Goodspeed's braces, noting that no good artist could sing with that much metal in their mouth.

The comments proved fatal for Goodspeed's career even though she promised to continue singing. She later captured the experience on her blog, confessing that she became the object of hate and abuse following her mistake on the show.

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She ended by noting that she hoped there was something good waiting for her. However, Cowell was not the only one with a brutal assessment of her singing abilities.

Her former coach, Ed Faris, a producer/songwriter in Los Angeles, worked with Goodspeed in the early years of her career. He described her as a bit delusional for thinking she would make it big as a singer.

He stated that he realized no one would take her seriously in the industry after hearing her voice. He added that she had several emotional outbursts during recording sessions which made working with her a challenge.

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In the months and years that followed, Goodspeed seemed to have been on a constant decline. Her profile described her as a single lesbian, but she lived alone for much of her life.

Although she had no criminal records, police authorities searched her house after believing she had suicidal tendencies. The LAPD later took Goodspeed for a mental evaluation after her loved ones voiced their concerns.

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FAMILY REACTS

Following her death, Goodspeed's family blasted Cowell for his harsh comments and her humiliation on national television. Her niece remarked that the moment crushed the 30-year-old's aspirations.

Her family also dismissed the claims that Goodspeed was a stalker. Her brother said she was only a normal fan. In addition, Goodspeed's family claimed she and Abdul had coffee together once at Starbucks, dismissing fixation claims.

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Sonja McIntyre, her niece, described her as good and cheerful, adding that she did not have any weird attitude towards Abdul, as was widely claimed. McIntyre also claimed Goodspeed's decision to change her name to Paula had nothing to do with Abdul.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Other international suicide helplines can be found at befrienders.org.

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