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Source: Shutterstock

Rich Woman Leaves Millions to Her Unwanted Daughter – Her Last Wish States She Can't Just Take the Money

Rita Kumar
Feb 14, 2022
11:00 P.M.
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A wealthy mother left millions to the daughter she never wanted, but as a final wish, stipulated the girl couldn’t just quickly take the money. 

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What happens when family members aren’t happy with the last will of a deceased dear one? Well, there’s no doubt there’d be a bit of drama. This was the case of a young woman when she found out her estranged wealthy mother had left her an enormous inheritance. However, it was seeded with a small catch—she was not allowed to take a penny from it unless she abided by her mom’s condition.

Turning to Reddit’s “AITA” sub, 19-year-old user InheritanceMine recently brought her plight to the internet’s notice. Apart from dealing with the money war melodrama, she was stuck between choosing her future and the parents who raised her for 13 years.

Rich mother leaves millions to unwanted daughter | Photo: Shutterstock

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The Original Poster (OP) first shed some light on her birth history. As a twist of fate, OP was born to a wealthy woman who despised marriage and babies.

Despite opting for birth control precautions, the mom and her partner fell pregnant. Furthermore, the dad was already married to a woman with barely one percent chance of conception. 

Although OP’s bio mom had decided to terminate her pregnancy, she changed her mind when the dad and his wife stepped forward to adopt the baby and provide child support. The couple took on OP under the pretext of raising her as their biological baby, assuming they wouldn’t have a child again.

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The stepmom adopted the baby under the pretext of raising her as her biological daughter | Photo: Unsplash

However, the girl’s stepmom miraculously welcomed a baby boy the following year, and the parents gradually started casting the spotlight on their son and sidelined the daughter.

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OP immediately consulted her lawyer, who later disclosed why she couldn’t take a penny from her inheritance.

When OP turned 13, she moved in with her bio grandma, who’d petitioned for visitation after discovering she had a granddaughter. OP’s dad and stepmom were delighted to send her away so that they could entirely focus on their son. 

Growing up, OP was sidelined by her dad & stepmom after they welcomed a son | Photo: Pexels

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Fast forward six years, the 19-year-old was treated to a shocking surprise when her late bio mom’s lawyer and trustee disclosed to her the enormous inheritance her mom left for her. 

OP’s dad and stepmom met with her after the news of her overnight “multimillionaire” status reached their ears, but they were still unaware that nobody could take the money until OP fulfilled her mom’s final wish. 

The Redditor was baffled when they told her she needed to share the money because, as far as she knew, she hadn’t told anyone about her bio mom’s will and inheritance.

OP's stepmom & dad found out about her inheritance & demanded she share the money | Photo: Pexels

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OP’s parents expected her to share her newfound wealth so they could send her brother to an Ivy League school, but she was determined not to share the life-changing money from her legacy. She asked the internet if she had decided wrong.

“You are under no obligation to give them the money. A parent has an obligation to care for their kids. They can’t turn around and say, “Now give us money to pay us back for doing what we were supposed to be doing anyway,” Redditor OldGrumpGamer stated

User Johjac agreed with the person, suggesting it was still OP’s choice, saying:

“If you want to, and are able, to help your brother, then go for it. It’s your choice, though, and I can’t see why any reasonable person would fault you for choosing not to.”

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People online sided with OP & stated parents are the ones obliged to care for their children | Photo: Pexels

OP immediately consulted her lawyer, who later disclosed why she couldn’t take a penny from her inheritance. According to her late bio mom’s will, OP could only inherit her mother’s estate if she went to business school. 

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“So, I couldn’t even give money to my dad and stepmom even if I wanted to, which, thanks to all of you, I learned I have no moral obligation to do and WON’T be doing,” she concluded.

Meanwhile, OP’s brother had a major blowout with his parents as he intended to take up arts and had decided to move in with her. As for the inheritance, OP has been hell-bent on completing her business degree to claim it, as her late bio mom wished.

OP is hell-bent on graduating with a business degree to claim her inheritance | Photo: Unsplash

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Questions to Ponder:

Are children obliged to share their inheritance with their siblings?

OP claimed the inheritance her bio mom left for her was life-changing money and that she wasn’t willing to share it with her stepbrother. She was confused if she needed to, considering her dad and stepmom raised her for 13 years and had no money to send their son to an Ivy League school. But the people online suggested she was under no obligation to give her brother money if she didn’t want to. Would you decide the same if you were OP?

Do you think parents need to set a clause in their will to better their children’s lives like OP’s mom did?

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OP’s bio-mom left a clause in her will stating OP could only claim her inheritance after graduating with a business degree. She indicated her mom had this clause seeded in the will to help her stabilize her life before becoming the rightful beneficiary of the money. As a parent, would you support setting specific clauses in your will?

If you liked reading this story, here’s one about a woman who inherited enormous wealth from her late grandfather and refused to fund her brother’s cancer treatment.

All images are for illustration purposes only. Would you mind sharing your story with us? Maybe it’ll change someone’s life. If you’d like to share your story, please mail it to info@amomama.com. 

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