Woman was healthy. Now she lives in a glass cage that is only 25 square meters

Apr 09, 2018
12:58 A.M.
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This woman was still very young with her whole life ahead of her when she suddenly became inexplicably ill. 

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Juana Muñoz was 25 years old in 1989, living with her husband and 1-year-old son when tragedy struck. Today, nearly 3 decades later, she is confined to a glass cage of just 25 square meters. 

As reported by Shared, Muñoz lives with no human contact, and no access to a cellphone, television, or radio. 

The 53-year-old woman explained that the worst part of her life is not the pain that she suffers with, but rather the psychological damage she endures in not being able to live a normal life with her loved ones. 

"In a few weeks my grandchild will be born and I do not know if I will be able to hold him at some point in my life," she said. 

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She has been confined to the glass cage for 13 years already. 

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In the time since she first fell ill in 1989, the Spaniard has developed four incurable chronic diseases: multiple chemical sensitivity, fibromylagia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and electrosensitivity.

Despite almost 3 decades to figure it out, doctors are still puzzled as to what caused her sudden severe health decline. 

Muñoz believes that she became ill after she was poisoned by her husband's homegrown potatoes. She had been collecting the potatoes to bring them home when she came into contact with dust covered in an anti-germinating agent. 

After she had washed the dust away, her eye began to itch. She scratched it, and almost instantaneously her eyes and tongue started swelling up. 

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She was rushed to the emergency room, but she was given anti-inflammatories and sent home. Hours later, she had to return. 

Muñoz then spent the next 5 days lying unconscious in the ICU, with her tongue so swollen she could barely breathe. 

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"I came to the conclusion that the origin of everything lies in the poisoning that I suffered," she has explained. She hopes that her story will warn others about the dangers of the chemicals that are put onto produce. 

In an attempt to understand what had happened to Muñoz, doctors sent away samples of her blood and the pesticides that had been on the potatoes, but they mysteriously went missing. 

The anti-germinating agent her husband had used was later removed from the market without much explanation, and without Muñoz's family having had anything to do with it. 

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