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Stuttering soldier reads bedtime story to his little daughter

Jun 16, 2018
10:08 P.M.
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The veteran's biggest fight is with his own stuttering as he reads bedtime stories to his daughter every night.

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A soldier of the U.S. Military, Lance Lambert, uploaded to YouTube a video of himself reading a bedtime story to her daughter, Avery. The video showed him reading to his daughter despite struggling with his stuttering issue.

The stuttering veteran has overcome the most life-threatening of feats, but he dreads this one simple routine that he follows with his daughter. The 29-year-old single father told Today that reading to his daughter every night is "terrifying."

The YouTube video revealed just why the soldier dreads reading the bedtime story to his daughter so much.

It took Lambert around 11 minutes to get through the entire storybook of Aladdin and required occasional help from his daughter to say out the words.

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The video also showed Avery leaning over to kiss her father on the back of his head before snuggling back into the covers. By the time Lambert reached the end of the story, his daughter is sound asleep.

According to Lambert, he shared the video of his reading with everyone because he wanted everyone to see how difficult even the simplest of tasks can be for people living with a stutter.

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"The response was overwhelming from my friends and family, so I put it on YouTube because I thought it would relate to other people who stutter," Lambert told Today.

Over the years, Lambert has been through several speech therapy sessions. He was sent to an intensive stuttering therapy program in the military as well but it wasn't able to cure him.

Lambert admitted that he often omitted saying some words or specific sounds that might trigger his stuttering but he could not use those tactics while reading aloud.

He explained that his daughter loved Aladdin and he had read it to her a lot of times. But the story was a difficult one to read for him because "there's a lot of S's in it."

                                                                                                                                        

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