Family puts hole in living room wall to find the source of frightening noise coming from inside

Aby Rivas
Oct 26, 2018
12:53 A.M.
Share this pen
FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail

It was a typical day in the life of a family from Thailand when they heard a strange noise coming from the walls. After further inspecting, they decided to call specialists to break the wall, and what they found left them in shock.

Advertisement

As reported by Daily Mail, a Thailandese family was having a relaxing day at home, watching TV together, when the father, Somchai Subdang, noticed a strange sound coming from the walls. At first, it was hard to identify where it came from, but after a joint effort, the final located the sounds at one of the house’s walls.

Source: Youtube/ONLY WE CAN

Advertisement

When Subdang got close, the clunking sounds began louder, but he was surprised also to hear some hissing through the wall. Suspecting what could be behind the walls, he called some experts and got ready to break the plasterboard.

Is not unusual for insects, rodents and small reptiles to live on empty walls, but Subdang’s newest roomie was an unexpected one.

Source: Youtube/ONLY WE CAN

Advertisement

A VERY LARGE ROOMIE

After the experts arrived, they proceeded to break the wall with a hammer, and after the first bits of wall crumbled, they could see the responsible behind the clattering noise: it was a 15-feet-long python snake that was trapped in there, moving around while trying to find its way out.  

Source: Youtube/ONLY WE CAN

Advertisement

It took another few hits from the hammer and some help from the rescuers for the snake to finally get its head out of the wall, and the animal control expert immediately caught her while he pulled on the rest of the body to get it out without breaking the wall completely.

Source: Youtube/ONLY WE CAN

Advertisement

Sudbang was relieved about getting rid of the animal, but confessed he wasn’t looking forward to getting the wall fixed:

“I'm not afraid of the snake when it's stuck in the wall, but it could have been scary if it got into the ceiling then dropped down onto me while I was sleeping. I'm disappointed that I'll have to fix the house now. But that's better than having a snake hiding in the house.”

​ Source: Youtube/ONLY WE CAN

Advertisement

Subdang’s fear of a snake falling from the ceiling into his bed came true for a family in Brisbane, Australia. It certainly sounds like something out of a nightmare or a horror movie.

FIGHTING TROUGH THE CEILING

Two male coastal carpet python snakes ran into each other on the ceiling of a home while tracking down a female and, as its custom for snakes, got into fierce combat to establish dominance and set which one would be the one to pursue the female.

Advertisement

They fell through a vent into the family’s guest room that was luckily inhabited. Even after landing, they kept on fighting each other, and when the snake expert got there, she took the chance to videotape them as they were oblivious to their surroundings.

Advertisement

She later explained that the snakes were relocated to a natural habitat and they were freed together so they could keep with their combat. They are not poisonous snakes and won’t target humans, but pythons had enough strength to strangle anything that threatens them.

A BUZZING WALL

On a similar story, a family from Germantown, Tennessee had been hearing a buzzing sound coming from one of the exterior walls of their house, and after noticing some bees flying around, they decided to call an expert to take care of the problem.

But neither the family nor the expert, David Glover aka The Bartlett Bee Whisperer, had a way of predicting how huge the problem was.

Advertisement

After taking an infrared image of the wall, Glover realized that there was a gigantic honeycomb behind the wall that was the home to thousands of bees. There was a hole in the wall and another in the corner of the window above it that allowed the insects to go in and out of it.

Advertisement

Glover had to remove the bricks one by one in order not to disrupt the bees or damage the honeycomb. After hours of work, he was able to transfer the comb in pieces to special containers.

Advertisement

Then, he vacuumed the stray bees that were left behind to add them to the honeycomb after being relocated to local beekeepers to refill their colonies.

“No one is aware of the size of their honey bee hive. They are all surprised because they are expecting something the size of a wasp nest or hornet’s nest. The infrared gives them the first clue, but that’s only the brood combs of the hive,” he told Bored Panda.

Advertisement