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Jamie Lee Curtis jumps the gun over confrontation between Kentucky student and Native American

Rodolfo Vieira
Jan 23, 2019
02:14 P.M.
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Famous actress Jamie Lee Curtis was quick to apologize for jumping the gun regarding the situation between Nick Sandmann and Native American Nathan Phillips.

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Curtis admitted that she should have known better than to comment on something she wasn't entirely sure of and that she was wrong for doing so.

The apology was made through her official Twitter page, and, along with her statement, she posted Sandmann's side of the story.

Experienced actress Jamie Lee Curtis Getty Images

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ACKNOWLEDGING HER MISTAKES

Curtis confessed to having made the 'snap judgment' based solely on the photograph released by the media, showing Sandmann standing in front of Phillips with a smile on his face at the Lincoln Memorial.

“I wasn’t there. I shouldn’t have commented. I’m glad there wasn’t violence. I hope theses [sic] two men can meet and find common ground as can WE ALL."

Jamie Lee Curtis, Twitter, January 21, 2019

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CELEBRITIES ON THE ATTACK

The actress was one of the many celebrities who took to social media to severely condemn the boys' actions, but she was the only one to apologize for it.

Alyssa Milano, also an actress and popular activist, compared the 'Make America Great Again' hats to the Ku Klux Klan hoods and accused the students of bigotry based on their March for Life protest.

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Comedian Kathy Griffin had an equally aggressive posture and demanded the identities of the Covington Catholic High School students to be revealed.

Chris Evans, the actor who has played the role of Captain America throughout the years, described the situation as 'appalling'as well as disrespectful and praised Phillips for showing strength and dignity.

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WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED

But the truth is that, unlike what was initially portraited by the media, the teenagers were the ones approached by the 64-year-old as they were waiting for their buses.

"There are two sides to every story."

According to Sandmann, the group was harassed by a religious group called the Black Hebrew Israelites, whose members insulted them, to which they replied by doing the famous 'haka' dance.

That was when Phillips approached Sandmann and played the drum in front of him for a while, a moment that the teenager described as startling and confusing.

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