Tia Mowry's Experience of Growing up with a White Dad & Having a Black Husband

Tia Mowry opened up about the pains of growing up biracial and how this trickled on with her own family today. She compares racism then and now and reveals it's worse now for her Black husband.

Tia Mowry is very familiar with the complications of being biracial. She grew up with a White father and married a Black husband. 

“I had to learn how to adapt to seeing my husband get questioned about buying something very expensive."

CONFESSIONS OF A BIRACIAL DAUGHTER

In her YouTube channel, “Tia Mowry’s Quick Fix,” the former child star opened up about her realizations on racism then and now.

According to Tia, it was different for her Black mother, Darlene Mowry who married her White father, Timothy Mowry as compared to her Black husband, Cory Hardrict who married her, a multicultural woman. 

Tia Mowry and Cory Hardrict on November 1, 2015 in Westwood, California | Source: Getty Images

Tia Mowry and Cory Hardrict on November 1, 2015 in Westwood, California | Source: Getty Images

Tia reveals since her father was White, racism wasn’t as tough for her growing up. It was her mother who suffered from racial tension. In fact, Darlene couldn’t take the heat dating Tia’s father that she actually broke up with him and fled to the Army. But Timothy went after her and they eventually eloped. 

The actress admits, she too was once called the n-word for crushing on a White boy in the third grade. It was then she realized there was more to being a product of a biracial family. Luckily for Tia, her parents made her see that racism shouldn’t be an issue when it comes to love.

On her channel, Tia said that her parents were full of love and they continued to instill in her that love was greater than all of the negativity around her. She added

“And what was the most amazing advice was their actions. So, when they were telling me that love is greater than all of that and you see them together and they’re Black and White, that is the biggest advice that you can get is when you see it coming from actions and them being an example.” 

SENTIMENTS OF A BIRACIAL WIFE MARRIED TO A BLACK MAN

Times are different today for Tia, who married a Black man. Tia says she’d often witness Cory being discriminated against because of his skin color, something she never saw with her father. 

"What I’m saying is, my husband’s not White but my husband is like my dad, when it comes to here, in the heart. And that’s what I’m attracted to.”

“The racism that I experienced with him is mind-blowing,” Tia says of her husband of 11 years. 

“I had to learn how to adapt to seeing my husband get questioned about buying something very expensive. My husband was walking into some sort of pharmacy and the security guard is questioning him, first it started with him eyeing him down and asking questions.”

THE PAIN OF A BIRACIAL MOTHER RAISING MULTICULTURAL CHILDREN

Tia says these kinds of incidents urged her to have a conversation with their son, Cree who himself was told at age five that his color was not pretty. It happened during camp. Tia recalls sitting down with her son after that to make him aware of what he’s up against growing up.    

“People choose to look past love and spew hate. That's what hurts me because I've never experienced so much hate ever in my life.”

Fortunately for Cree, he has his parents to show him the example that marriage transcends the boundaries of race and color. Tia admits she fell for Cory not because he’s Black but because he has the qualities of her father. 

“My dad is very patient. My dad is very kind, shy at times, quiet, very nurturing. He’s always wanting to make sure that you’re okay and that’s my husband. So I guess what I’m saying is, my husband’s not White but my husband is like my dad, when it comes to here, in the heart. And that’s what I’m attracted to.”

THE HATE EXPERIENCED BY A BIRACIAL WIFE MARRIED TO A WHITE MAN

As opposed to Tia, her twin sister, Tamera Mowry married a White man like her father. The co-host of “The Real” has her own story to tell about being judged for marrying former Fox correspondent, Adam Housley. Many slammed her interracial marriage as Tamera continued to defend it. 

“People choose to look past love and spew hate. That's what hurts me because I've never experienced so much hate ever in my life,” she said in an interview on Oprah’s “Where Are They Now” in 2014. 

Tamera has proven through the strength of her marriage that all that noise is just that, noise. What matters is she's happy with her husband and their two children and that life can still be a breeze if she chooses to see past the negativity.