Queen Elizabeth Reportedly Acknowledged 'Deep-Seated Divisions' in Her Annual Christmas Speech

Queen Elizabeth reportedly reflected on the "very bumpy" year coming to a close during her annual pre-recorded Christmas speech in commemoration of the holiday. 

The 93-year-old monarch looked stylish in a regal blue dress as she delivered this year's message surrounded by Christmas cheer and family photos in the Green Drawing Room at Windsor Castle.

THE FOCUS OF THE QUEEN'S SPEECH

In line with the spirit of the holidays, reconciliation became a recurring theme as the Queen used the 75th anniversary of D-Day and the events that followed as an example, as she reportedly said:

“In the true spirit of reconciliation, those who had formerly been sworn enemies came together in friendly commemorations . . . putting past differences behind them.”

The Queen noted that if small steps are taken with the intent of overcoming "deep-seated divisions," it can bring both understanding and harmony. But the Queen also knows the road is not an easy one.

With her sparkling diamond-and-sapphire Prince Albert brooch, given by Albert to Queen Victoria in 1840 before their wedding, the Queen added:

“The path, of course, is not always smooth, and may at times this year have felt quite bumpy. But small steps can make a world of difference.”

ITS A LONGSTANDING TRADITION

The annual royal tradition dates back to 1932. Initially called the King's Christmas Message, it consisted of a short address wherein the monarch reflected on significant events and family matters during the year.

ADAPTING TO THE TIMES

Up until 1957, the King's Christmas Message made its way to the public via radio, but that year, Queen Elizabeth agreed to televise her first message live.

Filming took place from the Queen's quarters at Sandringham, but three years later, the live recordings made way for a pre-recorded version instead. The switch made it more convenient for everyone, and it also allowed for the footage to be sent to all the Commonwealth nations ahead of Christmas day.

The first color broadcast of the Queen's Christmas message came in 1967, and she has annually graced television screens in color every year since, except for 1969.

It was Prince Charles's investiture as Prince of Wales that year, and the Queen chose to write her annual message instead of broadcasting it because she reportedly felt there had been enough exposure to the family. 

In 2012, exactly 80 years after King George V, the Queen's grandfather, broadcast the very first Christmas message, the Queen recorded her first-ever holiday message in 3D.

Queen Elizabeth II records her Christmas message to the Commonwealth, in 3D for the first time, in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace on December 7, 2012, in London England. | Source: Getty Images.

Queen Elizabeth II records her Christmas message to the Commonwealth, in 3D for the first time, in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace on December 7, 2012, in London England. | Source: Getty Images.

WAYS TO SPREAD THE HOLIDAY CHEER

With Christmas just around the corner, there are several ways for people to deliver their message to loved ones on the festive religious holiday.

With so many media platforms available, there is a variety of warm, funny, cheerful, and even inspirational Christmas images and clips available for inspiration.

Whichever way you choose to let those you care about know how you feel, its the knowing that you care the counts the most.

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