Story of the Day: Bride-to-Be Doesn't Want Autistic Nephew at Her Wedding

A bride-to-be was hoping that if the pandemic was overcome in due time and everything was safe early enough, she and her husband would get married in September.

They wanted something small, nothing too excessive or ever the top. They just wanted close relatives, a total of about 25 couples or 50 people, because the hall they planned to use had an open bar, and they wanted everyone to be legally able to drink — above 21.

A couple talking a walk with their dog | Source: Pexels.com

A couple talking a walk with their dog | Source: Pexels.com

She sent an invitation to her stepsister and her husband. Her stepsister, who was older than her by sixteen years, however, had other plans. Rather than bringing her husband, she chose her 23-year-old autistic son, Johnny.

Johnny had never spoken a single word in his life, but he did a few things that made people uncomfortable. He couldn't sit still, he would make loud noises, and when they tried their best to calm him down and salvage a situation, he would start playing with a very loud fire truck.

The bride loved her nephew, Johnny, a lot, but the last place she needed him to be was at her wedding, the day she had been dreaming of. She recalled the last time that Johnny had been to a wedding.

He started yelling during the moment of silence. Her stepsister and her husband had to swoop in and move him outside, but those in the hall could still hear him screaming.

Photo of a young couple in their wedding dress with forest as the background | Photo: Shutterstock

Photo of a young couple in their wedding dress with forest as the background | Photo: Shutterstock

Also, Johnny only ever wore large ill-fitting grey sweatpants. His aunt's wedding theme was coordinated with specific colors, and grey was not one of them. 

When she told her sister these things, she was furious and called her a horrible person. Her family heard of their discussion, and they all refused to come to the wedding if Johnny wasn't invited.

Photo of An upset woman sitting on her bed. | Photo: Upsplash

Photo of An upset woman sitting on her bed. | Photo: Upsplash

Her friends understood and supported her, but she still wondered if she was a bad person. Many of the users who came across the post decided that the bride-to-be was, in fact, not the bad person. 

Husband and wife smiling on their wedding day | Photo: Shutterstock

Husband and wife smiling on their wedding day | Photo: Shutterstock

They shared experiences that they had with family members with the same condition and how it always got in the way of things. They concluded and assured her that she was not the bad person in the situation.

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