Sharon Stone, 62, Does Not Believe That Looks Don't Matter — Discover Why

In a recent interview, award-winning actress Sharon Stone said that it is a "big, fat stupid lie" when somebody claims looks don't make a difference. 

Sharon Stone, who shot to stardom after starring as Catherine Tramell in the 1992 erotic thriller "Basic Instinct," discussed how Hollywood and society treat women during a candid interview with The Telegraph.

"You don't even realize how much [looks] matter until they start to go," Stone told the outlet. She added, "It's a big, fat stupid lie if anyone says that they don't."

Sharon Stone at Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California in September 2019. | Photo: Getty Images

Sharon Stone at Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California in September 2019. | Photo: Getty Images

The 62-year-old actress pointed out that she is done letting others tell her how her face and body are. She insisted that all women have "big cellulite close-ups" and that they should not be ashamed of it.

"You don't have to stay a beautiful girl forever," Stone continued, "and we really have to start dealing with the fact that it's cool to be a grown-up and intelligent woman."

In 2001, the "Irreconcilable Differences" actress experienced a stroke.

In a 2019 interview, Sharon echoed a similar opinion, saying she began to realize that she was going to go for being more like a Europian woman who often has a better perspective about aging.

According to her, a Europian woman got more beautiful with age and could understand that women are more beautiful than girls because they know more and have greater experiences in life.

The actress also said that people do not generally react to beautiful women in the most pleasant manner. People usually think that if a woman is attractive, she must be stupid or shallow, she said.

In 2001, the "Irreconcilable Differences" actress experienced a stroke, prompting her to spend her 40s focusing her attention on self-care. That decade, she said, was her favorite one so far.

The actress admitted that it was her time of greatest change. Nonetheless, it was also the time where she thought she was her most beautiful, she added.

To stay healthy, Stone said that she gets creative with her workout routines at the gym. The actress shared that she drops by 24-Hour Fitness four or five times a week.

According to her, she combines different workouts. That includes yoga, pilates, dance, and total-body stretches. If she could not make it to the gym, she said she gets creative at home by doing leg lifts in the bathtub.

Stone recently promoted her upcoming web television series, titled "Ratched." She will star opposite Sarah Paulson and Cynthia Nixon. Created by Evan Romansky, the series is set to premiere on Netflix on September 18.

Meanwhile, Stone earlier admitted that she misses hugging her friends. The actress said she has not been able to do that due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

ⓘ We at AmoMama do our best to give you the most updated news regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, but the situation is constantly changing. We encourage readers to refer to the online updates from CDС, WHO, or Local Health Departments to stay updated. Take care!

Related posts
The Sun: Sharon Stone, Who Cheated Death Three Times, Says She Is Lucky to Be Alive after Massive Stroke
Getty Images
TV Shows Aug 23, 2020
The Sun: Sharon Stone, Who Cheated Death Three Times, Says She Is Lucky to Be Alive after Massive Stroke
Sharon Stone Looks Nothing Her Age in a New Make-Up Free Selfie – How Old Does She Look?
Getty Images
People Jul 12, 2020
Sharon Stone Looks Nothing Her Age in a New Make-Up Free Selfie – How Old Does She Look?
Sharon Stone Recalls Intense Feeling of Being Struck by Lightning & Thrown across Her Kitchen
Getty Images
People Jun 21, 2020
Sharon Stone Recalls Intense Feeling of Being Struck by Lightning & Thrown across Her Kitchen
Sharon Stone Teaches How to Create 'Safe Room' Amid Protests Following George Floyd's Death
Getty Images
Coronavirus Jun 05, 2020
Sharon Stone Teaches How to Create 'Safe Room' Amid Protests Following George Floyd's Death