twitter.com/eliistender10 youtube.com/BhamUrbanNewsUK
Source: twitter.com/eliistender10 youtube.com/BhamUrbanNewsUK

Grieving Widow Asks Subway Station's Help to Hear Late Husband's Voice over Their Speakers

Brittany Chalmers
Mar 03, 2022
01:40 P.M.
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A woman lost her husband and always went to the subway station whenever she longed to feel close to him. For years his voice was played over their speakers, and when it was replaced by someone else, she was devastated.

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Margaret McCollum was heartbroken after her beloved husband's passing. However, she could hold onto his memory by visiting the underground platform at Embankment station in London, England. 

The voice recording gave McCollum a sense of happiness because she felt as if her partner was never far away. However, one day she was horrified to discover the 40-year-old recording had been replaced. 

Margaret McCollum on the underground platform at Embankment station [left]; Oswald Laurence whose voice was used in the subway station for decades [right] | Source: twitter.com/eliistender10 youtube.com/BhamUrbanNewsUK

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IT BROUGHT COMFORT TO A GRIEVING WIDOW 

For years commuters heard Oswald Laurence's voice as he instructed them to "mind the gap," but Transport for London (TfL) decided to change the digital announcement in 2012. They were unaware of the comfort it brought to his grieving widow.

McCollum reached out to TfL and inquired about the change. She explained her story and asked them to reinstate his voice. They responded to her request and sent her something special just in time for the 2013 Christmas. 

Margaret McCollum listens to a recording of her husband's voice | Source: youtube.com/BhamUrbanNewsUK

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THEY REINSTATED HIS VOICE 

TfL agreed to bring his voice back to the Northern Line platform at Embankment and sent McCollum a copy of the recording. Now, she could listen to her husband's voice whenever she missed him. 

TfL was more than happy to reinstate Laurence's voice, especially after discovering he was a wartime evacuee. At 17 years old, he joined the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and spent much of his life working as an actor. 

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SHE WAS HAPPY TO HEAR HIM AGAIN

Laurence eventually lost his battle with cardio-vascular problems in 2007. McCollum, who called her husband's voice "the most gorgeous voice," was undoubtedly thrilled to hear him over the speakers again.  

In the past, McCollum would occasionally miss her train just to hear his voice one more time. She added:

"Although he could do accents, it was his natural speaking voice - clear, precise, authoritative. His announcement didn't say 'please' - it was perfectly minimalist."

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ANOTHER WIDOW DID SOMETHING TO REMEMBER HER HUSBAND 

People reminisce about lost loved ones differently, and for one woman, the process involved her six-decade-old wedding dress. Amy Buchan Kavelaras from Ohio showed the world a photo of her grandmother wearing her special white dress. 

Grandmother Ruth became emotional as she wore the dress because it brought back a flood of memories. In sharing the photo online, Kavelaras encouraged others to wait for love like her grandparents' because it was worth it. 

Both Grandmother Ruth and McCollum found ways to cherish their departed spouses. In the process, they showed the world a glimpse of true love that lasts even after death. 

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