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NHL hockey teams are paying tribute on the ice to the lives lost in the bus crash

Rebelander Basilan
Apr 13, 2018
09:22 A.M.
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The team was on their way to a game when the fatal accident happened.

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The deadly crash that occurred in Saskatchewan, Canada involved a tractor-trailer and the Humboldt Broncos team's bus, as reported by Daily Mail.

According to multiple reports, 15 people were confirmed killed after the tractor-trailer hit the team's bus recently.

The NHL hockey teams, Chicago Blackhawks and Winnipeg Jets, paid tribute to the victims.

Wearing jerseys with 'Broncos' written on them in place of their nameplates, the players stood in a circle for a pregame ceremony.

They bowed their heads as they observed a minute of silence to honor the lives lost in the accident.

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"It's a sad, sad day for the entire hockey world today," said Joel Quenneville, the Blackhawks coach.

Chicago Blackhawks and Winnipeg Jets also donated $25,000.

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In Toronto, Ontario, the players on the Toronto Maple Leafs also paid tribute to the victims as well as the Calgary Flames and the Vegas Golden Knights in Calgary, Alberta.

A

GoFundMe

page was also created to help the families affected. The campaign has already surpassed $3.5million so far.

There were 29 people on the bus when the collision took place at 5 pm, according to Daily Mail.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said that the Humboldt Broncos team's bus was headed to the town of Nipawin for a semi-finals playoff game at the time the accident happened on Highway 35, about 19 miles north of Tisdale.

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The 15 victims have been identified as Head Coach Darcy Haugan, team Captain Logan Schatz, 20, Assistant Coach Mark Cross, 27, Jaxon Joseph, 20, Stephen Wack, 21, Adam Herold, 16, Logan Hunter, 18, radio announcer Tyler Bieber, volunteer team statistician Brody Hinz, 18, Conner Lukas, 21, Evan Thomas 18, Xavier Labelle, 18, Jacob Leicht, 19, and bus driver Glen Doerksen.

"It's disbelief. It's shock. The deepest grief that you can ever imagine," Kevin Garinger, a coach who runs a hockey school in Prince Albert, told the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix.

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