Source:

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's children won't be princes or princesses

May 04, 2018
12:25 A.M.
Share this pen
FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail

Soon enough, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle could be welcoming their first born. Their child will not be a prince or a princess according to royal experts.

Advertisement

The children of the soon-to-be-married couple will only be called either a lord or a lady unless the Queen decides to bless them with a royal title.

As explained by the Mirror, the titles given to the Royal Family had been limited by King George V. in 1917, he issued a Letters Patent.

The patent stated, "...the grandchildren of the sons of any such Sovereign in the direct male line (save only the eldest living son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales) shall have and enjoy in all occasions the style and title enjoyed by the children of Dukes of these Our Realms."

It means that Prince Harry and Markle’s children will not be HRHs if the couple ever bares children while Queen Elizabeth II is on the throne. They will only be known as Lord or Lady (forename) Mountbatten-Windsor.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Although, if the Queen decides to do so, she could issue a new Letters Patent that would alter the initial decision. She has done it before with Prince William and Kate Middleton’s children.

Given that he is the firstborn son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales, little George was always going to be called HRH Prince George of Cambridge.

As for Princess Charlotte, Prince George’s younger sibling, she was supposedly going to be called Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Diana Mountbatten-Windsor.

Middleton was three months pregnant with Prince George in December 2012, when the Queen issued a Letters Patent under the Great Seal of the Realm.

It declared that "all the children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales should have and enjoy the style, title and attribute of royal highness with the titular dignity of Prince or Princess prefixed to their Christian names or with such other titles of honor".

Advertisement