Fire department warns of children's toys being sold with hidden fireworks inside

Rodolfo Vieira
Jul 05, 2018
01:28 P.M.
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Parents have been warned about fireworks inside of toys that are being sold all over North Carolina, which can severely injure those unaware of their nature.

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The warning was issued on July 2, 2018, two days before the 4th of July, which is usually celebrated with fireworks, causing a high demand from the public.

Still, even after the 4th of July, these toys keep being found at stores and the City of Concord Public Safety took to their Facebook page to let everyone know of the dangers that the toys represent.

The items are quite appealing to a child's eyes considering that they look like Pete the Dragon and My Little Pony novelty figurines. But, unlike the original ones, these toys shoot fireworks and smoke.

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The colorful unicorn, for example, can reach temperatures of around 200 degrees after ignition. The toy will then shoot sparks from its horn and front hoof.

But that's not the only danger regarding the unicorn. The horn, which is detachable, is considered a choking hazard, especially when it comes to children under the age of three.

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Just like the unicorn, the green dragon can overheat, reaching temperates of about 180 degrees. The toy shoots projectiles from its mouth and tail, and releases a colored smoke.

Although the lookalike figurines have a small sticker on them, warning parents and children that they are flammable objects, the average child will not notice it and proceed to play with it without a second thought.

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According to the National Fire Protection Association, over 18 000 fires a year are caused by fireworks, which can lead to several deaths and an average of $43 million in property damage.

The City of Concord also shared a few numbers gathered by the NFPA: in 2017, nearly 13 000 people ended up in the emergency room with injuries caused by fireworks, with a third of those numbers being children under the age of 15.

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