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August 10, 2018

Three elderly ladies try to trump each other

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Ageing parents can be so competitive when it comes to their children.

This joke is about three such ageing parents.

Three old ladies are sitting around a table playing bridge and bragging about their sons.

“My Freddie,” said Margaret. “Everyone should be so lucky to have a son like my Freddie. Once a week he brings me a huge bouquet of flowers, he’s constantly bringing me out to restaurants to eat, if I so much as hint that I want something the next morning it’s on my doorstep.”

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Then comes Gertrude, bragging about her son, Sammy.

“That’s very nice about your Freddie,” says Gertrude. “But with all due respect, when I think about the way my Sammy takes care of me, it just can’t compare. Every morning as soon as I wake up he greets me with bacon and freshly brewed coffee. Every lunch he comes over and cooks me a gourmet lunch, and every supper he brings me to his house for supper, he truly treats me like a queen.”

“WELL!” Barbara chimes in. “I don’t want to make any of you feel bad or anything, but wait until you hear about my Harry, twice a week he pays someone $200 an hour just so he can lie on their couch and talk to them, and who do you think he speaks about at those prices?" Asks Barbara with a big excited double chin smile, “I’ll tell you who he speaks about! ALL HE SPEAKS ABOUT IS ME!”

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Parents excessively bragging about their children has been a long-observed phenomenon.

According to University of Pennsylvania sociologist Annette Lareua, child-centered bragging may be an outgrowth of the hothouse style of parenting that pervades our culture.

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Psychiatrist Alvin Rosenfeld has a worry about this.

"Many focus on their children's achievements, rather than getting to know their kids as individuals," he said.

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He continued: "The dilemma is when kids become valued only for their accomplishments - or when they live up to your fantasies of what they ought to accomplish - not for who they are as people."

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