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August 24, 2018

Katie Piper's acid attacker to be released soon

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Stefan Sylvestre, the man who attacked Katie Piper with sulphuric acid, is set to be released in the next few weeks despite his life sentence.

Back in 2008, the criminal followed Piper's former boyfriend's, Daniel Lynch, orders and threw the corrosive substance at her face, leaving her disfigured.

Upon learning of the decision made by the Parole Board, Piper took to her Twitter account to reveal how she has been dealing with the fact that Sylvestre will be a free man again.

According to her, the last few weeks have been quite hard for her and she is trying to come to terms with the controversial decision.

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"Over the past 2 weeks, Strictly has already given me such a welcome and positive distraction from my past. Whilst there is never a good time to hear this news, I am glad I have this new journey to concentrate on."

Katie Piper, Twitter, August 23, 2018

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THE TRIAL

The Parole Board's decision has been received with criticism. According to the Mirror, Harry Flecther, the director of Victim's Rights Campaign, said that further evidence as to why the public is safe from the offender should be provided.

At the time of the trial, Sylvestre and Lynch were described as being 'the face of pure evil,' but the former is being considered a changed man given his exemplary behavior behind bars for the past nine years.

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A CHANGED MAN

The 30-year-old is said that have 'displayed empathy for the victim and expressed remorse and shame for his actions,' as well as 'a desire to live a law-abiding life in the future.'

Although his release has been approved, several concerns were raised regarding his future plans, which were considered unrealistic. It was also argued that Sylvestre wouldn't be able to 'lead a crime-free lifestyle and resist negative influences.'

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Still, despite all those factors, he was regarded as someone with good skills, self-control and the will to 'maintain the change that appeared to have taken place,' which explains why he was deemed not dangerous.

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