Angry white woman calls cops on little black boy, yelling that he'd ‘grabbed’ her backside

Odette Odendaal
Oct 13, 2018
01:44 P.M.
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On Thursday, October 11, Jason Stovetop Littlejohn uploaded a video on YouTube about a shocking turn of events the previous day, asking for it to go viral.

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At a Brooklyn bodega chaos broke out as a woman dubbed ‘Corner Store Caroline’ accused a nine-year-old boy of grabbing her buttocks, assaulting her.

Source: Facebook/Jason Stovetop Littlejohn

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The video uploaded by Littlejohn shows the woman called 911 reporting that the little black boy touched her inappropriately saying:

“I was just sexually assaulted by a child. White lady calls the cops on black lady, I get it.”

Read more on our Twitter account @amomama_usa.

Source: Facebook/Jason Stovetop Littlejohn

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The mother of the child tries to comfort her son and her daughter who is crying hysterically. Not impressed by the response of the 911 operator she gives her phone number and address in order for the police to get hold of her later before hanging up, looking at the camera she arrogantly suggests the video gets sent to World Star. One passerby, shocked by the unfolding events, stop calls ‘Cornerstore Caroline’ out on her behavior saying:

“What is your problem? Did you seriously just call the police on a child? Go home.”

‘Corner Store Caroline’ is quick to respond:

"No white lady I will not. You don’t know what you’re saying. You cannot shame me, you are a child. You are young enough to be my daughter. One white girl to another."

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Source: Facebook/Jason Stovetop Littlejohn

Another witness can be heard repeating she is a pedophile and should go home. A man intervenes trying to split up the two woman, but other passersby continue to criticize the accusing woman and tensions escalate, making it increasingly difficult to understand the rest of the tirade.

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Source: Facebook/Jason Stovetop Littlejohn

The accuser appears to be saying that the mother of the boy was a police officer, insinuating that the boy touched her behind because his mother is a cop after seeing her police badge. The video stops but the commotion still went on afterward. None of the people involved in the incident have been named.

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Another woman in Milwaukee caused a scene that went viral when she accused Corvontae Davis of breaking into a car near the Milwaukee Public Market. She called the police and Davis waited for them to arrive, figuring it would look bad if he left, even though the car was his. The police responded to the call and confirmed that the car was indeed his, however, the woman left before the police arrived.

Afterward, he commented on why he thought she had phoned the police:

“I was getting ready to put money in a meter or whatever, and she has nothing else better to do than ask me if I was breaking into my car. So, I hit unlock. It wouldn’t open, so I went around to the other side and opened the door after hitting unlock. By that time, I hear this lady shouting, screaming Dude, why are you breaking into that car? Whose car is that? Does it belong to you?“

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Davis also added that its stereotyping and racial profiling and that questions should be asked before jumping to conclusions.

Another incident went viral when Jasmine Edwards posted a video online claiming she had been racially profiled while at the neighborhood pool. A man named Adam Bloom approached her demanding that she produce her ID card to prove she was a resident of the neighborhood.

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She gave him her address but he wanted proof. When she failed to produce her ID card he called the police. After the police arrived and established that she was indeed a resident Bloom still insisted on seeing identification. Afterward, Edwards commented:

“I feel this is racial profiling. I am the only black person here with my son — and he walked all the way to me, to ask for my ID. He asked for my address. I give it to him, and then he came back and said, ‘Well, I didn’t catch your address correctly. Can you provide an ID to prove the address that you gave to me?' Why do I have to show my ID? Is there an ordinance in the neighborhood?”

Bloom’s lawyer, John Vermitsky responded that Bloom is the pool chairman of the Glenridge Homeowners Association, the neighborhood where he and Edwards live and randomly asks residents to produce their ID’s a couple times a week, which is part of his responsibilities.

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