Michael Jackson's Accusers Wade Robson and James Safechuck Could Reportedly Bring Lawsuits to Trial & Sue Estate for Millions

A new court ruling gives Michael Jackson's accusers, Wade Robson and James Safechuck new hope for their cases to be heard. The two men are poised to sue the singer's estate for millions. 

The two men who accused Michael Jackson of child sexual abuse may find their day in court years after their cases were dismissed. Wade Robson and James Safechuck are poised to sue Jackson’s estate for millions due to a new California law. 

For years, the two men denied they had been abused by Jackson even under oath. It was only after bouts of depression and anxiety hit them and they had their own children that they decided to speak up and tell their story. 

Michael Jackson performing at American Bandstand's 50th Anniversary Celebration in April 2002. | Photo: Getty Images

Michael Jackson performing at American Bandstand's 50th Anniversary Celebration in April 2002. | Photo: Getty Images

THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE NEW LAW

In 2013, Robson and Safechuck sued Jackson for claims the singer abused them as young boys. Their lawsuits were dismissed in 2015 and 2017 respectively due to the statute of limitations. They filed appeals to no avail. 

But as of October 13, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a new law extending the statute of limitations for child sexual abuse cases. According to the new law, child abuse victims may sue their perpetrators until their 40th birthday or within five years since the discovery of psychological injury as a result of the sexual assault. 

In light of the new law, Robson, 37 and Safechuck, 41 found new hope. During a recent Appellate Court hearing, the California Court of Appeal issued a tentative ruling to overturn the dismissal of their cases. 

WHAT ROBSON AND SAFECHUCK HAD TO SAY

TMZ caught up with Robson and Safechuck after the hearing and they are very optimistic about the future of their case.

"We're just excited to have an opportunity to speak the truth in front of a jury. That's what this whole thing's been about and we're getting closer to that moment," Robson said.

"If the ruling is unchallenged, Safechuck and Robson stand a greater chance of fighting their case and claiming a substantial amount from Jackson’s estate which as of December 2018 has increased by $1.7 billion since the singer’s death in 2009. 

JACKSON'S ATTORNEY'S RESPONSE

Meanwhile, the attorney for Jackson’s estate, Howard Weitzman spoke to the publication and remains confident that the new cases will still be dismissed. 

"The Court of Appeal agrees that these cases must be returned to the trial court to be analyzed under the new law signed by Governor Newsom,” Weitzman affirmed.  But he adds, "The Appellate Court's tentative ruling is not on the merits of Robson and Safechuck's allegations and the Court in no way said that these cases will go to trial."

One of Michael Jackson's accusers, Wade Robson attending an Emmy party in September 2007. | Photo: Getty Images

One of Michael Jackson's accusers, Wade Robson attending an Emmy party in September 2007. | Photo: Getty Images

 

Further arguments will still be heard in court in the coming days. Reports suggest this could still reverse the Appellate’s ruling. However, if the ruling is unchallenged, Safechuck and Robson stand a greater chance of fighting their case and claiming a substantial amount from Jackson’s estate which as of December 2018 has increased by $1.7 billion since the singer’s death in 2009. 

Michael Jackson walking out of the courtroom during a 2005 trial for a 10-count indictment for allegedly molesting a boy. | Photo: Getty Images

Michael Jackson walking out of the courtroom during a 2005 trial for a 10-count indictment for allegedly molesting a boy. | Photo: Getty Images

ROBSON AND SAFECHUCK'S STORY

Robson and Safechuck detailed their childhood experiences of sexual abuse in the hands of Jackson in the HBO documentary, “Leaving Neverland” which aired in January. 

Robson admitted it didn’t feel strange to him at the time because of his admiration for the singer. Safechuck likewise said that he was in awe of the friendship Jackson offered him which lured him into the abuse. Both were reportedly told by Jackson to keep their relations a secret. 

Michael Jackson on a tour plane with a young James Safechuck in July 1998. | Photo: Getty Images

Michael Jackson on a tour plane with a young James Safechuck in July 1998. | Photo: Getty Images

For years, the two men denied they had been abused by Jackson even under oath. It was only after bouts of depression and anxiety hit them and they had their own children that they decided to speak up and tell their story. 

Jackson’s estate slammed these claims and the documentary claiming they were financially motivated. It also insisted there was no evidence to corroborate Robson and Safechuck’s stories. 

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