August 05, 2018

Cancer patient's obituary revealed she was fat-shamed by doctors

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Before Ellen Maud Bennett, she insisted on making her own obituary and revealed that she may have been fat-shamed by medical practitioners.

Bennett, who was 64 years old from Canada, was diagnosed with a type of cancer that was inoperable. The doctors gave him only a couple of days to live.

She passed away on May 1, 2018. Before she died, she left a specific request, according to the people close to her.

She wanted to make leave an impact on other people who have been victims of the stigma of obesity.

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Bennett’s family and friends recalled that during her final days, she was surrounded with a lot of love and humor.

Before her death, they said she left very specific instructions with how she wanted to be remembered.

She requested that her obituary, which became viral, spoke about how she dealt with being discriminated by doctors because of her size.

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In her obituary, she revealed how she sought out medical help for the past few years since she became unwell and the only suggestions the doctors gave her was to lose weight.

‘Ellen’s dying wish was that women of size make her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue,’ the obituary continued.

It was not stated up to what extent of discrimination Bennett received from medical professionals, but her story has spread on the internet since many people can relate to what she experienced.

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Online users have been sharing their own story and, at the same time, praising Bennett for her message.

Anti-fat bias has been common throughout the years. In fact, there had been studies conducted that focused on the issue.

In 2003, a study showed that more than 50 percent of doctors looked at obese patients as “unattractive, ugly, awkward, and non-competent” people.

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