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September 13, 2018

Man grabbed a camera in the hope of capturing humpback whales feeding and he wasn't disappointed

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Brad Rich, a fisherman from Alaska, captured a breathtaking moment when humpback whales breached the water to feed.  

Rich can be seen recording from his boat, and he was telling someone off-camera that "they keep up coming here behind the seagulls. 

Read more on our Twitter account, @amomama_usa. The footage can be seen below. 

The then asks the woman if they had already breached feeding and sounds almost disappointed that he might not get to capture anything significant. 

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Moments later he yells: "I hear them, I hear them! Holy [expletive.]"

The camera then pans to his left, where approximately 10 or more large humpback come up to feed, right next to his boat. 

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Seeing such a spectacular scene had Rich laughing and giggling hysterically. He can hear saying "Oh Lord," and "I just [expletive] myself." 

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He shared the short video clip to his YouTube account three years ago and it since been viewed more than 14 million times.

Also in Alaska, Tristan Krause captured a whale breaching the water near Pleasant Island earlier this month. 

The whale was impressive in size and caused a massive splash while whale watchers can be heard laughing in the background. 

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A similar recording was taken back in June when a family was vacationing at Port Macquarie in Australia. 

The woman explained that they went whale watching and "saw a whale breach in the distance and I just knew I wanted one video."

A whale also breached close to their ferry and completely soaked the tourists with water. Patsy Phipps, the photographer, said it was a magical moment. 

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Whales aren't called the giants of the ocean for nothing, and National Geographic reported that humpback whales weigh as much as 40 to 50 tonnes.

They can grow up to 63 feet in length and can be found along coastlines where they feed on krill, small fish and plankton.  

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