Eartha Kitt's granddaughter is all grown-up and looks just like her mother in recent pic

Aby Rivas
Oct 13, 2018
03:34 A.M.
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Eartha Kitt, one of the pioneer African American women in the entertainment industry, had a gorgeous daughter and even more beautiful granddaughter. Now a grown-up, Rachel Shapiro seems to be following her grandma’s steps, as she carries the same passion for music in her DNA.

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Kitt Shapiro, Eartha’s only daughter, is the proud mother of two children: son Jason, 27, and daughter Rachel, 22, whom she shares with ex-husband Charles Lawrence Shapiro.

Rachel has grown to become a gorgeous, talented lady and she’s a Instagram star with over 13k followers. Shapiro uses her page to show off her luxurious lifestyle, fashion looks and the songs she writes and sings.

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LEARNING FROM THE BEST

On an essay Kitt wrote for Closer Weekly earlier this month, the jewelry designer revealed that it was her mother who taught Rachel about music, making sure there was someone in the family to continue with her legacy. She said:

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“My mom left her her piano, and Rachel taught herself how to play it along with the guitar, and how to write songs. I think she’ll be the one that follows in her grandmother’s performing footsteps.”

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The girl graduated from Michigan State University last year, and it seems like she’s now working on her music while modeling on the side in New York City. Her mom, of course, is very proud of the Rachel, and in a recent pic posted by Shapiro to celebrate National Daughter’s Day, their resemblance is in full display.

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EARTHA KITT AND HER PARENTING STYLE

Kitt recently revealed that she learned about parenting thanks to her mother’s lessons while growing up.

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Eartha, who was abandoned as a child, and was physically abused by her caregivers, had to develop a relationship with nature to protect herself from the damages of her situation mentally. Kitt recalled how Earthea loved to use nature as a metaphor for everything:

“I remember seeing a slug when I was about five years old, and saying, “Eww! That’s gross. Kill it!” [Eartha] just looked at me and said, “You don’t have to like it, and you don’t have to think it’s pretty, but that slug has just as much right to exist as you do.” I find it fascinating how she used all the lessons she learned from nature in her youth to shape how she was as a human being.”

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MISSING ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

Kitt never met her father, an unknown white man, and that plagued her all her life, as she was missing a part of her identity. Even when she was allowed to look into her birth certificate at 71-year-old, her father’s name was blacked out by authorities.

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In an interview with the Observer, Kitt said:

“My mother was 71 at the time, and it was approaching the 21st century, and yet they were still protecting the name of the father even though he was clearly dead. They were protecting the white man because they would not have gone to that trouble to protect a black man. The courts still held it as legal to withhold the documentation. We were amazed. My mother assumed it was their dirty little secret."

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Eartha died in her home in 2008 after battling colon cancer. But she didn’t go peacefully; she went screaming at the top of her lungs. Kitt recalled on her essay that even though her tears, she was able to find joy because of everything her mother had taught her.

“After she passed, I turned to my husband and said, “I don’t know who’s waiting for her on the other side but, boy, I hope they’re prepared because they’re getting an unwilling participant!”

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