Experienced gynecologist supports late-term abortion law, says she's already done some

Jennifer Gunter, a gynecologist, has performed many medically necessary late-term abortions and shared details about the procedure.

She took to Twitter and gave her informed opinion on the highly divisive Reproductive Health Act that was recently passed in New York. 

The Reproductive Health Bill was signed on 22 January, incidentally the 46th anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court ruling. 

A CAUSE FOR CONTROVERSY

The backlash focused on the fact that abortion has effectively been decriminalized, meaning it would now be regulated under medical health laws, rather than the state criminal law. 

The other issue, which has caused controversy this past week, has been the amendment to the wording for late-term abortions.

Many people feel that the change to make late-term abortions available "at any time when necessary to protect a woman’s life or health" is overly vague.

Critics of the amended bill feel that the changes effectively legalize late-term abortion. However, Jennifer Gunter isn’t having any of it.

DR. GUNTER'S EXPLANATION 

Dr. Gunter shared a few stories from her experience performing abortions to give people some context for the procedure. 

She also explains why she sees no problem with the legislation change, and admits to having done abortions after the 24-week mark. Dr. Gunter adds: 

"For several years I lived in a state with no gestational age limit. I have never done one that was not medically indicated. I was never approached by any woman to do a non medically indicated abortion."

Sick of all the lies, Dr. Gunter explained that aborting after 24 weeks is not only "very rare," but also "very expensive." 

THE MOTHER'S LIVES WERE AT RISK

"These are not 'whims' because a woman is tired of being pregnant. These are situations with tragic fetal anomalies, sometimes compounded by maternal health issues," she said.

Dr. Hunter then listed several cases, such as aborting a triploidy pregnancy at 36 weeks, and an anencephalic fetus at 32 weeks. She concluded

"I could go one. [sic] The permutations and combinations of pregnancy horror are truly bizarre and tragic. A doctor, especially an OB/GYN, with no empathy or medical understanding of these situations? That is frightening."

OHIO HOUSE ADVANCED ABORTION BAN

Back in November 2018, The Ohio House passed a six-week abortion ban, with a vote of 58 to 35. At the time, the NARAL Pro-Choice Executive said: 

"Anti-abortion ideologues should not attempt to insert politics between a patient and their physician. What we’re seeing is state legislators [...] playing politics with women’s lives."

If the bill is passed, physicians performing abortions could face criminal charges as abortion would effectively be outlawed. 

The bill also makes no consideration for rape cases, incest, or to protect the mother's health. With that in mind, bans such as these block access to safe and legal abortions.

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