logo
Source:

Study Suggests Increase in Hate Crimes in Counties Where Donald Trump Held a Campaign Rally

Rodolfo Vieira
Mar 23, 2019
07:25 P.M.
Share this pen
FacebookFacebookTwitterTwitterLinkedInLinkedInEmailEmail

A recent study conducted by political scientists at the University of North Texas claims that Donald Trump campaign rallies have increased hate crimes by 226%.

Advertisement

According to the study, the results were obtained after comparing the numbers with those of counties that did not hold a rally back in 2016.

The objective of the study, originally published by The Washington Post, was to measure the correlation between counties that hosted a campaign rally and the increasing crime rate that took place in the following months.

Donald Trump during a border security event at the Oval Office in the White House | Photo: getty Images

Donald Trump during a border security event at the Oval Office in the White House | Photo: getty Images

Advertisement

ANALYZING THE NUMBERS

The scientists, professors Regina Branton and Valerie Martinez-Ebers, with the help of Ayal Feinberg, a Ph.D. candidate, reportedly used the Anti-Defamation league's map to measure the acts of violence.

In order to obtain the necessary information, the trio compared the counties where the rallies took place with others that shared the same characteristics, such as population and active hate groups.

Donald Trump delivering a speech at a rally held in Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 2016 | Photo: Getty Images

Donald Trump delivering a speech at a rally held in Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 2016 | Photo: Getty Images

Advertisement

MANY CRIMES DODGE THE STATISTICS

Despite the numbers suggesting the dramatic increase in hate crimes, the scientists shared that they could not precise whether Trump's speeches were the only determinant factor.

According to specialists, the number of hate crimes, which include vandalism, assault and intimidation, could be even higher considering that not all of them get reported.

Donald Trump prior to his National Emergency announcement at the White House | Photo: Getty Images

Donald Trump prior to his National Emergency announcement at the White House | Photo: Getty Images

Advertisement

"Research shows it is far more likely that hate crime statistics are considerably lower because of underreporting. .Additionally, it is hard to discount a 'Trump effect' when a considerable number of these reported hate crimes reference Trump."

Regina Branton and Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Ayal Feinberg, The Washington Post, March 22, 2019

NO FEELINGS OF GUILT

It is believed that Trump's speeches encourage hate groups to act, but the U.S. President has recently denied this belief using the Christchurch massacre in New Zealand as an example.

Advertisement

Trump's rhetoric has always been considered controversial in one way or another, and not even the dead can escape the Head of State's harsh words.

The late John McCain, for example, a war hero to millions, has been constantly bashed by Trump during the past week. The attacks were so bad that several people, including Anderson Cooper, have come to public to say that Trump was punching a dead man.

The President insulted McCain's intelligence by saying he was "last in his class," accused him of conspiring with Democrats to take him out of the picture and of not being a hero despite having been tortured for five years in Vietnam.

Advertisement
info
Please fill in your e-mail so we can share with you our top stories!
By subscribing, you agree to our Privacy Policy
Advertisement
Related posts

Mom Calls Police on Her 10-Year-Old Son after Finding Out He's Rude to His Teacher

May 14, 2022

Who Is Ezra Miller? Meet Personality behind the 'Fantastic Beasts' Franchise Actor

May 18, 2022

Jane Wyman Forced Ronald Reagan to Propose to Her ⁠— He Cried While Filing for Divorce

March 26, 2022

Inside Neil Cavuto's Health Issues That Resulted in Open-Heart Surgery and His Recent Absence On-Screen

February 10, 2022