September 14, 2018

Horse outperforms line-dancers in a spectacular show

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A Clydesdale horse drew the crowd’s attention away from line-dancers as they performed Billy Ray Cyrus’s “Achy Breaky Heart” in a show ring.

A video posted to YouTube shows five cowboy hat-clad people standing in the show ring with an eye-catching horse in between them.

When Cyrus’s 1992 smash hit, the horse starts to move. The crowd was stunned as he did all the steps to line dance. The horse’s dance moves were utterly unexpected. He executed the steps just as well as the dancers around him do.

Much impressed, the country starts himself posted a video of the performance to his Facebook page with the caption: “Best thing ever!!!”

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Follow us on our Twitter account @amomama_usa to learn more and scroll down to watch the video.

BOIL DOWN TO GOOD COMMUNICATION

The horse’s excellent execution of the steps can be attributed to the rider’s excellent conversation with him. He was responsive to her requests.

The YouTube clip, which runs for one minute and thirty seconds, has been viewed more than 1 million times since it was posted on April 23, 2015.

Horses are known to react to music. Racetrack grooms often whistle or sing to their horses to help relax them. Horses are said to enjoy classical and country music, especially when they’re resting, eating and being groomed in the barn. Some barns leave music playing while horses are in their stalls.

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BALANCING EQUINE BEHAVIOR

Music is a language that involves pitch, tone, frequency, and volume – elements of sound that horses and other animals use to communicate with, according to Equine Wellness Magazine.

These elements of sound also help animals assess their environments for survival purposes.

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Horses are said to prefer being in a barn with music as opposed to one without. Playing music helps mask outside sounds and vibrations, such as tractor engines, high-pitched tools, thunder, and other intense sounds. Because of this, music helps balance equine behavior because of it.

Horses also respond best to music with short melodies and strong rhythmic patterns. It’s not so much the style of music, however. Frequency and volume are the most important

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