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Anderson Cooper's 'Infectious Giggle Comes from His Mom' Gloria Vanderbilt, Andy Cohen Claims

Rodolfo Vieira
Jun 18, 2019
08:44 A.M.
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Famous television host Anderson Cooper is grieving the passing of his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, but fortunately, he has people who care about him by his side.

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Andy Cohen, one of Cooper's longtime friends, came forward to pay his respects to the late 95-year-old by remembering how much of an amazing woman she was.

According to Cohen, Cooper's "iconic and infectious giggle" came from his mother, who reportedly had a wicked sense of humor and an optimistic nature.

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REMEMBERING THE FASHION ICON

The "Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen" star took to his official Instagram page to share a heartfelt tribute to Vanderbilt, who drew ho her last breath on Monday, June 17.

Cohen wrote:

“Gloria Vanderbilt was an amazing woman who lived a life filled with incredible peaks and impossible obstacles. Through it all, she remained eternally optimistic with a wicked sense of humor."

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VANDERBUILT'S DEBILITATING HEALTH

52-year-old Cooper shared that the socialite died in the morning at home, with those she loved right by her side. The grieving son also revealed that she had been diagnosed with advanced stomach cancer.

Cooper recalled taking his mother to the hospital earlier this month, which was when they learned of the disease.  Vanderbilt allegedly reacted by saying: "Well, it's like that old song - show me the way to get out of this world, because that's where everything is."

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Cooper's "iconic and infectious giggle" came from his mother

Despite her advanced age, the CNN reporter claimed she was the youngest person around, very cool and modern and a truly remarkable mother, wife and friend.

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NO INHERITANCE FOR COOPER

During a past interview with Jess Cagle, Cooper revealed that he wouldn't inherit any of the Vanderbilt fortune after his mother's death and that he was okay with it.

According to him, he was raised to be independent and make his own money, and always saw people who inherit money to never being able to accomplish much on their own.

Cooper admitted he was glad he never had that expectation weighing on his shoulders, that safety net, which helped him become the successful man that he is today. 

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